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Archive for March, 2012

Teachers are my heroes.  Okay, not all of them.  There are some people who should not be teachers.  If you’ve been watching the news lately this has been clearly brought home.  But, in my experience, the vast majority of people who dedicate themselves to educating our children are passionate, caring people who genuinely care about enriching children’s lives.  But even great teachers need good support and training or they can’t be truly effective in today’s classroom.

As a parent of a child with an Autism Spectrum Disorder, I have been enraged, saddened and horrified by some of the stories of how teachers have been attempting to cope with the ever-growing presence of Autism in their classrooms.  In December there was the mortifying story of the teacher who placed a fourth grader with Autism into a duffel bag as form of punishment for his challenging behaviors.  The mother was called to the school and discovered her son…in a duffel bag.  The good news is the child was alive.  We could spend an eternity talking about all the things that are wrong with putting a child into a duffel bag for any reason, but I think we have to stop for a moment and think about how you arrive at thinking a duffel bag is a punishment solution.  It is an epic example of not having the skills, tools or training to know how to cope with challenging behavior.  With only a small amount of training and support that teacher could have known how to safely and effectively redirect that child’s behavior.

Even more recently there was the case of the teacher in Riverside County who was sending a student with Autism into a cardboard box as a punishment for his challenging behaviors.  The media covered the story and parents were appalled.  A cardboard box…really?  The school responded and while they did not defend the teacher, they defended the cardboard boxes.  The school has tried to create “safe environments” for students with sensory issues; a quiet place where they can take a moment to collect themselves.  This allows a child to regulate their states – before things get to a boiling point.  It is supposed to be something that prevents challenging behavior.  In order to work properly it has to be used before the challenging behavior occurs.  The teacher was not properly trained so she used it as a punishment after the challenging behavior occurred.  The exact opposite of how it was supposed to be used.  When a quiet place is used correctly you will see a dramatic decrease in challenging behavior.  It is a very specific intervention for a very specific type of behavior.  Because the teacher was doing the intervention wrong the student was engaging in MORE challenging behavior!  He needed a break and the only way he could get one was by misbehaving.  Talk about a mess.  Now you’ve got a child misbehaving, sitting in a box and there is no learning happening, all because the teacher wasn’t trained properly.  This is heart breaking to me as a parent because the fix is so easy, and had the teacher carried out this intervention properly her whole classroom would have run differently.

I look at the news and I hear the stories of districts spending money on “scream rooms” and other barbaric concepts simply to cope with challenging behavior.  It makes me crazy…as a parent, as a teacher, as a tax payer, as a person.  First of all I want to ask the Dr. Phil question…How’s that working for you?  If you put a child in a scream room and the child’s tantrums don’t decrease then you really haven’t helped that child, you just found a way to isolate them.  Wouldn’t it be better to give our teachers the tools and information to deal effectively with challenging behavior so ALL of our kids can get back to the business of learning?

One of the people I respect the most in this world, Dr. Adel Najdowski, is about to give a free webinar for teachers on how to effectively deal with challenging behavior in the classroom.  It’s free.  It’s online so there are no travel costs.  If you are a teacher who wants to do better I hope you will attend.  If you know a teacher who wants to do better I hope you will invite them.  If you are a parent I hope you will invite your child’s teacher, their principal and their school district.  If we truly want to educate our children we have to educate ourselves and our teachers.  Here is the flyer for the webinar, spread it around.  No child should be in a duffel bag, a cardboard box or a scream room.  Let’s get them in the classroom LEARNING!  If for some reason you can’t see the flyer contact support@skillsglobal.com to reserve a spot for the webinar.

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